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  • Junior Golf Burnout- See the Signs!

    JUNIOR GOLF BURNOUT





    When I was playing junior golf in the 1960’s and 70’s there were just a handful of national and statewide tournaments and relatively few junior golfers playing the game compared to today. During my junior year of high school, friends across the country and I highly anticipated the arrival of the American Junior Golf Association and couldn’t wait to enter the few events that would make up the first national “tour” for accomplished junior golfers.

    Today, U.S. junior players are blessed with several, year-long national tours. Additionally, every PGA section and city across America boasts rigorous, statewide and metro events, bringing more and more junior golfers into the game each year. It is not uncommon for an advanced junior golfer to travel to 15 (or more) events per year, excellent preparation for Division I college golf and possibly even a career in professional golf.

    High school golf has also evolved into strenuous schedules with daily practices and tournaments every Saturday during a season with regional and state championships that go late into the next season. All great opportunities to grow the game and experience team golf. But there’s a dark side to this progress . . . the possibility of total burnout at a young age.

    SEE THE SIGNS

    PHYSICAL FATIGUE

    If you are tired, anxious and drained, it is impossible to play well for an extended period of time. Talent and pure adrenaline may carry you for the short-term, but burnout won’t be far behind. Watch your tournament scheduling and ask the help of an LPGA or PGA professional to see if you are over- scheduling events. Too many rounds can, in fact, cause injuries and interfere with much needed rest. EAT HEALTHY and consult with a trainer to maintain simple workout sessions to help stay in shape and avoid injuries. A scheduled appointment with a nutritionist is well worth the money to implement a diet that improves your performance and endurance. This will also make the potential transition to college golf much easier for you.

    MENTAL FATIGUE AND STRESS

    It is easy to get overwhelmed and demand too much of yourself too quickly. Failing to achieve goals, even unrealistic goals, can easily translate into negative feelings about the game. Add competitive parents into the mix too and you will soon see teens that have schedules and practice session rivaling the most prolific tour players . . . and no down time to be a young teenager, not to mention a young student!

    Check with your pro about realistic expectations, achievable goals, and reasonable practice and tournament schedules. Have at least one day a week to chill out and rest. Also practice positive thinking (focusing on what you can and do accomplish) and be patient with your progress. If you are diligent (without being a fanatic) about your practice regimen (did someone say, “short game”?), you will see improvement.

    At The Golf Academy, our favorite expression is "Process Over Outcome". Simply put, focus on your process and task list of getting better and let go worries of your performance! Although some may disagree, I urge my students to keep up any other sports they may love . . . for enjoyment. There are quite a few options, may which will compliment your golf game.

    If you suffer from lack of confidence issues, try taking up a hobby that is "out of your comfort zone" like skeet shooting, piano, dance or horseback riding lessons. A new challenging hobby can bring back confidence in your golf game and help clear mental clutter on the course! College coaches often recruit two-sport athletes who can demonstrate athleticism on the course and on the field or court . . . and who aren’t afraid of 6 am workouts.

    CONSISTENTLY HIGHER SCORING

    This is a sure sign of burnout. If you are taking lessons, practice correctly every day, but if you are shooting higher scores each time out, something is definitely wrong! Take a break and consult with a professional that can evaluate your tournament and practice schedules. Sometimes a break can bring much needed drive and determination back into your game. There are many touring professionals that take a month off and don’t touch a club. You may be so consumed with “finding the perfect swing” that you have forgotten how to just get the ball in the hole! My best tournament finishes came in 1974-77 when Kentucky was experiencing some of the worst winters recorded. The year I won the Optimist Junior World, I had not touched a golf club all winter . . . and had tried cheerleading! Taking a break could be your best move.

    FEELINGS OF FAILURE

    This problem is burnout in a nutshell. No one can enjoy a round of golf and maintain perspective — remember, it is just a game—if they are feeling like a failure to themselves, to their parents, or to their coach.

    Gut-wrenching feelings of inadequacy can cause a player to quit out of the blue, especially if winning or perfection is expected in every championship. Find a counselor, golf professional, friend or former player that will listen to your frustrations. Realize that your scoring will have highs and lows and that you should be in it for the long haul, looking forward to teeing it up when you are 75 years old . . . and purely for the love of the game. This is hard to do as a pre- teen or high school student, but look at the small successes you are experiencing and focus on positive thoughts as you move toward you short- term and long-term goals. Step back each week and evaluate your game, first seeing your successes as accomplishments, and then seeing your weaknesses as opportunities for improvement during short intervals of excellent practice.

    Success—in golf and in life—generally requires hard work. But, in the end, if you are not enjoying the journey, you will eventually burn out. Keep it all in perspective, develop a training program that provides balance, set your goals wisely to allow for success . . . and don’t forget to celebrate those successes!



    Betty Baird Kregor, LPGA Master Teaching Professional consults and mentors athletes and their parents in all areas of performance and college recruiting using the DISC profile system. For more information visit www.straightshotinc.com and The Golf Academy, Persimmon Ridge Golf Club, Louisville, Kentucky. www.thegolfacademypr.com

    To schedule a consultation with Betty Baird Kregor about your goals and game plan for the future email Betty at bkregor@aol.com.

  • For Parents of Athletes: Be a Cheerleader!


         Raising an athlete of any talent level or any age is tough. In fact, very tough. Watching them go through ups and downs, triumphs and struggles, can be a emotional roller coaster and have you pulling your hair out over performance issues, coaches and crazy schedules. 

         You invest money and countless hours of your personal time. You sacrifice vacations and your own interests making sacrifices that most kids wont understand until they are older.  Date nights with your spouse or partner become tournament weekends spent in a small town where the heat index is over 100 degrees and there isn't even a Chick-Fil-A in town. 

         Given the stress,  it's easy to see why some parents take on roles like a coach, trainer, psychologist, instructor and detailed planner.  It's hard to let go and trust in the process and have patience in your child's progress.  

         It's easy to forget you have ONE JOB to be successful as a parent of an athlete during competitive performances- BE A CHEERLEADER. 

    • A cheerleader is positive and doesn't critique performances. 
    • A cheerleader never walks away over a poor performance. 
    • A cheerleader knows their role. THEY ARE NOT THE COACH.  
    • A cheerleader doesn't try to control or manipulate situations and performance. 
    • A cheerleader greets players after the game with positive energy and believes in "process" over "outcome". 
    • A cheerleader helps create momentum and a positive attitude for the athlete, which in turn helps his or her mental game. 
    • A cheerleader creates a FUN environment allowing the athlete to ENJOY competition.  Instead of demanding work ethic and practice, a cheerleader rewards those behaviors. 
    • So, start a new tradition this year as your son or daughter hit the course, field, or court and CHEER your way to a positive parenting experience.  Stay in the "process" of being positive. You may just be surprised at the "outcome". 
    Betty Baird Kregor, LPGA Master Teaching Professional consults and mentors athletes and their parents in all areas of performance and college recruiting using the DISC profile system. For more information visit www.straightshotinc.com

    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • So You Want To Play College Golf: Part Seven- College Visits & Financial Aid


    So You Want To Play College Golf: College Visits & Financial Aid

    This series of blogs on the steps in the college golf recruiting process wouldn't be complete without information on the importance of college visits and finding other sources of college aid. 

    A visit to a college or university spending valuable time on campus and seeing the golf facilities is where the athlete (if prepared) can determine whether the school and program is a good fit in all areas such as the financial aspect, academic offerings, golf program, coaching personality and more.  

    Once a visit has been scheduled with a coach whether by email or calling a coach,  there are important steps  that parent and junior golfers need to know to make a great impression! 


    Prepare. Prepare. Prepare.

    StraightShot Inc. encourages high school athletes and their parents to schedule unofficial visits as early as possible. These initial visits as early as sophomore year are a terrific way to begin a college search to find the right fit. Official visits cannot take place until the first day of an athlete's senior year for NCAA Division I schools and that's very late in the game for first visits!

    There is nothing like an upfront and personal view of a campus, coach, team and academic program to get you evaluating what you want from the college experience. And, an early visit provides invaluable information on ACT and SAT requirements that will have you focused on good test scores and grades.

    Nothing turns off a coach or administrator more than an athlete not being prepared for the visit. The following is a list of tips for your visit:

    • Do not wear jeans. Khaki pants, belt, dress shirt for guys. Dress pants, sweater, skirt etc. for girls.

    • Be engaged and ask questions. Look coaches in the eyes when speaking. Practice with friends, golf coach or parents in speaking skills.

    • Have a notebook with questions and take notes. List positives and negatives of visit, program, school, etc.

    • Parents should not take over in this process of talking to coaches. Take a walk, offer your child time with coach alone. Then have your time to ask questions.

    • Bring your updated resume to present to the coaches.

    • If you get a chance to meet the team, this is a great time to get great insight on

      the school and coach.

    • Always coordinate meetings with financial aid and admissions office on your visit.

    Get important academic requirement information, financial aid scholarship forms, FAFSA forms, ask about scholarships you may qualify for!

    Check out this document for a list of questions you can ask coaches while on your visit:

    Questions for Coaches.pdf


    Financial Aid

    Always check to see if you are eligible for financial aid.

    If you have studied the NCAA Student Athlete Handbook you soon realize there are a limited number of full athletic scholarships in every sport. These athletics-based scholarships must be renewed annually and the monetary amount of an athletic scholarship can change year to year based on your performance. They are awarded in a variety of amounts, ranging from full scholarships(which include tuition, fees, room and board, and books) to very small scholarships (books only). Your athletic scholarship may not cover but a small percentage of your college costs so it is crucial to look for other types of aid.

    For more information on the different types of financial aid available and a list of resources, see this document:

    Financial Aid.pdf


     After the Visits

    Review and rate your results.

    Write a follow up personal note to thank the coach for his or her time. Evaluate the school using a simple scale of 1-5 rating the general criteria like academics, location, dorm or lodging, quality of practice facilities, opportunity to improve, schedule, climate and other factors. StraightShot Inc. is proud of our record in mentoring athletes in evaluating schools and the "college notebook" or excel spreadsheet that we require athletes to keep of their visits is a key in our success. In the end, these notes hold the answer of your best college choice.

    Finally, stay in touch with coaches! Your final decision often rests on what relationships you have built through constant communication. 

    For more information or help with this process- please visit www.straightshotinc.com or email bkregor@aol.com to set up a visit! 

    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • So You Want To Play College Golf: Part Six- The Importance of Video in College Golf Recruiting


    Step Six-  The Importance of Video in College Golf Recruiting

    A video of your golf talent is an essential part of the college recruiting process. It may not win you an athletic scholarship, but it can certainly get you noticed. 

    In the past, professionals were needed to create expensive marketing videos that were mailed to coaches! Today, with smart phones and apps like iMovie, anyone can create a professional quality segment to showcase their abilities. 

    Here are some basic tips to make your own video: 
    • Film a short introduction stating your name, year of graduating class and high school you attend.  The iMovie app allows you to type information across the screen. Remember to dress appropriately! 
    • Film segments such as putting, chipping, pitching, irons, woods and driver that showcase your strengths.  Placing alignment sticks on the ground allow the coach to view your fundamentals of set up, posture and alignment as well as swing mechanics.  Ask your PGA or LPGA professional for help if you are not sure how to correctly use alignment sticks. 
    • iMovie has a font feature where you can type yardage and club information.  This is valuable information to coaches and instructors that view the film. 
    • iMovie allows you to "drop" each film segment into one video that should be no longer than two minutes.  Coaches are busy and don't have time to look at long videos.  They only need a few seconds of each shot to evaluate your talent and potential.  
    • Upload the film to YouTube and copy the "link" to that video to include in email correspondence to coaches and list on your resume. 
    • Some elite junior players elect to market themselves through their own website or other recruiting services.  Your video can be uploaded to your website or other web services who host your profile, resume and videos.  
    Here is an example of a College Golf Recruiting Swing Video: 

    StraightShot Inc. assists junior golfers in the production of college recruiting videos.  Contact Betty for more information on how StraightShot can assist in filming, editing and consulting in this essential form of marketing your skills.  For more information- please visit www.straightshotinc.com or email bkregor@aol.com! 

    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • So You Want To Play College Golf: Part Five- Tips On Creating A Resume for College Golf Coaches


    Step Five-  Tips On Creating A Resume for College Golf Coaches

    Every college golf coach expects to see a well formatted resume when considering a high school golfer for their team. It is usually your first introduction of yourself to a coach and it is crucial that it contain the information that a coach wants to see.  Unfortunately, finding a template and gathering information for a college golf resume is one of the most overwhelming steps in the recruiting process.

    StraightShot Inc. has helped thousands of junior golfers over the years in learning what information college coaches want to see in a resume.  Here are some tips and a template to help you get started:

    • Always refer to what year of high school you are in under your name.

    • A headshot picture is a good idea added to the upper right corner of the resume.

    • There is nothing more important to profile than your grades and test scores! College coaches look at grades first and then check your social media accounts before they start studying your stats or scores.

    • Include clubs, activities and community service.  It is very important to show interests other than golf.

    • List 6-8 tournament results from the last 12 months.  Do not include events from past years.

    • Include date, yardage, city, course, and other detailed info regarding your tournament.  Coaches like to see where you placed in the event as well as your score!

    • References are very important in a college sports resume!  Ask for permission from your references first and the list their title and include contact info.

    • Always attach your resume when emailing a coach for the first time and update your resume frequently to update coaches on your academics, extracurricular activities and tournament scores.  One of the biggest tips in recruiting is to update coaches on your progress and play.

    Betty is available for college advising. For more information- please visit www.straightshotinc.com or email bkregor@aol.com! 


    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • So You Want To Play College Golf: Part Four- Marketing Your Talents: Creating An Introductory Email to College Coaches

    Step Four- Marketing Your Talents: Creating An Introductory Email to College Coaches

    Know what coaches want to see and show it to them!

    Every college coach has a smart phone, tablet or laptop- therefore, marketing your athletic talents requires being familiar with technology such as email, attaching videos to emails, possibly having your own website and social media accounts, and more. You can't wait for coaches to contact you! High school athletes must rely on marketing themselves to programs to establish communication and relationships with coaches. 

    An email is your first communication with a coach. Use an excel file (you made in step three) with a list of your potential schools and coach's information to organize your email communication. It is important to make each email personal (see example attached) and even more important that you don't have your parents write the letter. Never bulk email coaches- it takes away the authentic nature of your message. Always mention academics first and have all your contact information available. Attach your resume and video and list in the subject line your name and graduating class. In the body of your email, mention your attachments. End your letter with your desire for an unofficial visit in order to learn more about the program. 

    Betty is available for college advising. For more information- please visit www.straightshotinc.com or email bkregor@aol.com! 


    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • So You Want To Play College Golf: Part Three- Creating Your College List


    Step Three: Creating Your College List

    Build your list based on your personality and eligibility!

    It's never too soon to begin starting a list of colleges or universities that match your academic and talent level in your sport. If you happen to be a potential all star and interested in NCAA Division I sports, you should begin your list in 9th grade. It is a very competitive recruiting process and you have to begin early. Don't wait for coaches to find you! Here are some tips in beginning to compile your list:

    • Trust a PGA, LPGA, former playing professional or coach to give you an objective talent evaluation. If you attend a camp or combine ask for guidance in seeing where your talent fits in the collegiate world. There are many different levels of play and you want your list of schools and programs to match your ability. To be recruited, you must be contacting schools where your athletic abilities match what coaches are looking for at that level. In my opinion, there's a school for just about any serious athlete. It takes research to find those programs.

    • With your talent evaluation, you can now attend a college golf tournament of schools that fit your athletic ability. Search the school website for tournament schedules and go watch them in action. This is the best tip I can give you! Go see in action the coaching styles, athleticism and talent needed for that division. Start developing your college list of schools that match your talent level and review your DISC personality profile test (www.straightshotinc.com) to begin planning what type coach and campus environment you desire.

    • Ask around! Find former players, current college players in your area, coaches and alums for information on schools they know that fit your abilities. 

    • Talk to your high school counselor about colleges that for your academically.

    • Join www.collegegolf.com and begin searching schools on line  that fit your criteria such as major, population, ACT and SAT scores, and more.  This searchable directory of golf programs allows you to see what handicap or scoring average you need to be considered at those programs.   This service also gives you the coach's name, phone contact and email address needed to create your contact list. 

    • A good marketing list has over 30 schools and you can add or remove schools as you narrow down your focus of what criteria is important to you.  If you happen to have excellent athletic skills, have a broad array of divisions on your list. Be open minded to all divisions and associations at this point prior to visiting. You never know what will be your best fit!

    • Start an excel file of the school, coach's name and contact info, ACT or SAT requirements, location, college division and more criteria. You may want to add blank tabs to later describe notes on your visit such as cost, dorm conditions, aid offered, coaching style and other factors that will impact your decision. Recording notes on your visit is the best way to make a mature decision later.

      Resources

     Betty is available for college advising. For more information- please visit www.straightshotinc.com or email bkregor@aol.com! 


    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • So You Want To Play College Golf: Part Two- Building Your Athletic Profile


    Step Two: Building Your Athletic Profile

    Compete in Nationally Ranked Golf Tournaments

    Competing in the nationally ranked tournaments not only gives you more exposure and improves your ranking, but the experience gained by playing against the best players on the best courses is invaluable. Cautiously select a tournament schedule that is challenging and fits within your budget. 

    If you are new to junior golf tournaments and tours, experience some success locally and statewide before entering top level tournaments.  StraightShot Inc. suggests selecting tournaments based on National Junior Golf Scoreboard criteria so you can have the best ranking possible.  

    College coaches pay attention to rankings and it's important that you and your parents can find area tournaments that provide points toward your ranking! 

    Find Nationally Ranked Tournaments 

    National Junior Golf Scoreboard

    USGA

    AJGA

    Golfweek Junior Golf Tour

    Hurricane Junior Golf Tour

    Know Your NJGS Ranking 

    Years ago college coaches would travel to many tournaments during the summer to find possible recruits, but now with so many tournaments and hundreds great players, they rely more on resources like National Junior Golf Scoreboard to locate possible recruits.  Visit www.njgs.com to understand how the rankings are determined and select a tournament schedule that will maximize your ranking.

    Through their paid subscription service at www.njgs.com, you can create a resume that coaches can access, see your tournament history and access information that will help you in the college recruiting process. 

    Betty Baird Kregor can help create a tournament schedule for 2016 that fits your budget and gameplan to play college golf.  Visit www.straightshotinc.com to schedule a consult with her. 


     

    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • So You Want To Play College Golf?- Part One: Academic Eligibility


    Introduction To Series

     

    Strength is a character trait that we call upon throughout our entire lives.

    Successful college athletes have the opportunity to build strength that will last them a lifetime. Physical strength is secondary to the emotional strength-building journey StraightShot athletes will travel. Competing for a team that complements the athlete's personality will build a lifetime of discipline, self-confidence, sportsmanship, responsibility and a healthy competitive spirit.

    It is my purpose as a Master Teaching Professional and my passion to help our children build strength in preparation for life's many challenges.

    It is my goal for all Straightshot athletes to find the right college fit in order to maximize their opportunity for a successful experience. The question is, where do we start?

    This simple guide will be a 7 part series. It is designed to walk your family through the fundamentals of College Recruiting. Academic eligibility, building your athletic profile, contacting coaches, visiting schools, choosing a school, finanical aid, and sigining with your dream school are all topics that will be covered. For more information and to view future post, visit www.straightshotinc.com.

    Best Regards,

    Betty Baird Kregor

    Master LPGA Teaching Professional

     


    Part One: Make Sure Your Have Academic Eligibility

    Eligibility is not something to take for granted. Be very cautious when presented with gifts or awards for your golf ability. High School Athletic Associations, NCAA and USGA don't share all of the same rules, so be sure to refer to each of them.

    High GPA and Test Scores

    A good academic record is more important than a good golf record. College coaches are reluctant to select a player that might have trouble staying eligible, so study hard and stay focused. Below are links to the SAT and ACT websites. All college bound high school students should take the SAT and ACT more than once since most students receive higher scores on their second and third attempts. Start taking these tests during your sophomore year, so come recruitment time you will have test scores to include in your resume.

    Click here to check out the SAT website.

    Click here to check out the ACT website.

    Freshmen and Sophomores

    • Start planning now!
    • Work hard to get the best grades possible.
    • Take classes that match your high school’s list of NCAA courses.
    • The Eligibility Center will use only approved core courses to certify your initial eligibility.
    • You can access and print your high school’s list of NCAA courses at www.eligibilitycenter.org.
    • If you fall behind, use summer school sessions before graduation to catch up.

    Juniors

    • At the beginning of your junior year, complete your registration at www.eligibilitycenter.org.
    • Register to take the ACT, SAT or both and use the Eligibility Center code “9999” as a score recipient. Doing this sends your score directly to the Eligibility Center.
    • Double-check to make sure the courses you have taken match your school’s list of NCAA courses.
    • Ask your high school counselor to send an official transcript to the Eligibility Center after completing your junior year. If you have attended more than one high school, the Eligibility Center will need official transcripts from all high schools attended. (The Eligibility Center does NOT accept faxed transcripts or test scores.)
    • Before registering for classes for your senior year, check with your high school counselor to determine the amount of core courses that you need to complete your senior year.

    Seniors

    • Take the SAT and/or ACT again, if necessary. The Eligibility Center will use the best scores from each section of the ACT or SAT to determine your best cumulative score.
    • Continue to take college-prep courses.
    • Check the courses you have taken to match your school’s list of NCAA courses.
    • Review your amateurism responses and request final amateurism certification on or after April 1 (for fall enrollees) or October 1 (for spring enrollees).
    • Continue to work hard to get the best grades possible.
    • Graduate on time (in eight academic semesters).
    • After graduation, ask your high school counselor to send your final transcript to the Eligibility Center with proof of graduation.

    A wonderful reference to get started in your college search and academic eligibility is the NCAA 'Guide For The College Bound Student Athlete'. Click the link below to download a free PDF:

    http://www.ncaapublications.com/


    Betty Baird Kregor is an LPGA Master Teaching Professional and owner of StraightShot Inc., specializing in the DISC personality system to mentor and advise athletes of all ages and abilities. 

    In 2014, Kregor retired from over 27 years of teaching golf to consult athletes in the mental aspects of sport an serve as a "performance coach" for goals, scheduling, practice programs, college advising and more. 

    Her LPGA education in DISC profiling allows an athlete to maximize their performance with "self awareness" of their strengths and weaknesses. It is also an important tool in finding the right college fit which is a component of Kregor's expertise. College athletic consulting is a service that benefits 9-12th graders in learning how to market their talents, schedule college visits and value the importance of academics. 

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop please visit www.straightshotinc.com for more information.

  • THE MENTAL GAME: The Secret to Your Most Successful WCHS Yet

    Photo by: Howard Schatzberg


    THE MENTAL GAME 

    As equestrians, we spend countless hours 'learning' our horses. What are their quirks? What makes them tick? What can you do to set your horse up for success? But the horse and it's rider are a pair. So what if we took the time to understand ourselves as athletes, too? DISC profiling can help you become a better competitor, trainer, or owner.

    For years, DISC personality profiling has helped business people communicate more effectively and hire workers that fit their jobs and management teams.  Through testing, employees also gain insight into how they can effectively improve their performance in the workplace and find "their fit" in the company. 

    Now the sports world is finding the DISC system to be beneficial to athletes.  Many NBA teams use this system to draft and recruit players whose test scores "fit" their team chemistry and coaching philosophies.  

    Sports psychologists and performance coaches also use DISC test results to help individual athletes increase their performance and develop strong mental games.   

    The idea is simple: champions that can repeatedly perform well, have excellent "self awareness" of their personality traits.  They are aware of their strengths and weaknesses and can learn to "balance" their personality to prevent mental mistakes and ensure continued focus and motivation. 

    Champions who know their traits also minimize mistakes by staying true to their strengths.  Just as a successful trainer stays true to whom they are with horses, clients and building on successes. 

    There are four distinct personality traits of which you can test low, mid, or high range in your results.  These scores help an equestrian rider, trainer and owner learn the basis of their motivation in their sport, problems that arise from being too low or high in a trait, what trainer or coaching style fits them best, and much more.  

    To take your free DISC personality test, visit the link here and compare your results to the following:

     

    Once you have your DISC results, self-awareness is the first step to having a stronger mental game in the ring. 

    If you are a professional, it is the first step in recognizing the strengths and image of your barn. 

    Also as a trainer, you can begin to market the strengths of your traits to attract and maintain customers that "fit" your operation.  

    Is your barn branded as a "Dominance" barn where winning is the main focus? Is your barn the "Influence" barn where all the food and drink are served? Maybe your barn is the "Steadiness" barn where camps provide a focus on lifelong learning and there is a tight knit group of clients.  Lastly, is your operation "Compliance" driven, with clients urged to practice and perform to perfection?  

    Trainers can also use DISC to recognize your client's strengths and weaknesses and learn to adjust methods, training, and routines to have your riders happier and performing better.   Obviously a low Dominance rider who is timid and passive, will not respond well to a high Dominance trainer screaming instructions.  A successful trainer who wants to keep clients will "adjust" their teaching techniques to that personality. On the flip side, a high Dominance rider will actually focus and often perform better with screams and intense coaching. 

    For an amateur exhibitor, self-awareness of test results can expose the mental factors that need work. 

    For instance, if you scored low in Dominance as an exhibitor, simply recognizing this fact is the first step in gaining more confidence. Simple adjustments like making your next lesson have a competitive component to it, can be helpful.  

    "Confidence is simply the feeling you get from a series of successes," says Kregor.  

    So, are you practicing enough and adding a competitive component to your lesson to add some Dominance to your personality for "balance"?  

    Trainers can benefit from the DISC test as well.  

    "I see a lot of professionals that forget the FUN aspect of the business," said Kregor.  

    Scoring low I (Influence) can be a problem for a trainer in a "showing" sport.  Sometimes just awareness that they need balance and to bring back the "fun" attracts more customers and brings more championship ribbons.  

    Finally, there is a fascinating aspect of the horse world and DISC, that isn't present in other sports, says Kregor.  You have a 1000 pound animal that has their own DISC personality score and experienced trainers can match up riders with horses that suit their traits. 

    "This is a real strength of my good friend Sarah Byers," says Kregor.  "She has a great gift in matching up horse and rider personalities to create great teams." 

    Equitation is a prime example of horses that require the Steadiness and Compliance traits to be successful.  When matched up with riders who are also patient and strive for perfection, you have incredible performances.  

    The five gaited horse would score high D and I, bursting into the ring having fun and saying "Get out of my way and look at me!".  To be a stand out team, the rider should also develop high confidence and a "look at me attitude" which is present in the Dominance and Influence traits. 

    The DISC personality profile test is a fun way to open up dialogue of differences between personalities and provide self-awareness to a rider of their strengths and problems without ridicule or judgement.  With work and subtle changes in training, that athlete can develop a mental toughness and maximize their talent level. 


     

    Betty Baird Kregor is a LPGA Master Professional who uses DISC personality profiling to "life coach" athletes and maximize their mental game in sport. 

    Betty has been involved with Saddlebreds since 2001 when her daughter, Mollie began her showing career with Rob and Sarah Byers of Premier Stables in Simpsonville, Ky.  Molie’s dedication to honing her skill garnered her World’s and National Championship with horses of her own, as well as many catch rides.

     Betty Kregor works with all types of athletes, teams and coaches  including equestrians and trainers to help them find a "balanced" mindset. Whether you are interested in gaining more confidence, communicate more effectively with customers and riders, or develop a stronger mental game DISC is an effective tool.  

    To take your free DISC personality test visit 

    http://www.straightshotinc.com/personality-test

    If you are interested in contacting Betty regarding a consult or workshop: 

    BKregor@aol.com